High, Low and in Between: Understanding Blood Pressure

When you’re feeling good, it can be easy to assume that your blood pressure is normal. But this isn’t always the case. “People often think, ‘I feel fine, how can I have high blood pressure?’” said Jackson Hatfield, MD, primary care physician at Archbold Primary Care. “People believe they would have symptoms to let them know there is a problem. Unfortunately, we can have high blood pressure for a long period of time before developing any symptoms.” Because high blood...



Know Your Numbers!

The numbers below tell an important story about your heart health. Learn what they mean and ask your primary care provider how you can keep them in healthy ranges. Good and Bad Cholesterol Unhealthy cholesterol levels lead to heart disease. Total cholesterol: Less than 200 mg/dL LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol: Less than 100 mg/dL HDL, or “good.” cholesterol: Above 40 mg/dL for men and 50 mg/dL for women Triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood: Less than 150...



CT Coronary Calcium Screening, Do You Need It?

It’s common to hear that calcium is good for your bones. But, that’s not the case when it comes to your heart. Coronary arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart. When there’s a buildup of plaque, made up of calcium and other substances, it can narrow or close the arteries. These calcifications can form in many places throughout the body, including small and large arteries and heart valves, which can be a sign of heart disease. “Most often, the more calcified plaque in...



Heart Symptoms You Should Not Ignore

Is your heart trying to tell you something? Heed these warning signs that it could be in trouble. In the midst of life’s busyness, you may be tempted to shrug off unusual health symptoms. But you should never delay care when you experience symptoms that could be signs of heart problems. Symptoms that could be warning signs of a heart attack and require emergency medical attention include: Chest pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain (typically in the center of the chest) that...



Get Healthier, Live Longer

Bariatric surgery can help you lose weight – and add years to your life. The benefits of weight loss are many, from reduced risk of cardiovascular disease to increased energy. But bariatric, or weight loss, surgery can multiple these benefits and lead to a longer, healthier life. Research has shown that obese patients who undergo weight loss surgery live an average of three years longer than those who receive other forms of obesity care. In fact, people who have any form of...



Back Pain? Keep Moving!

Moving while you have a sore back may feel counterintuitive, but research suggests it may be a good way for your to recover. Whether you slept wrong or exercised too intensely, your back hurts, and you are not sure what to do. What you should not do, however, is lie in bed. Research suggests prolonged bed rest may cause your back muscles to stiffen and lose strength and flexibility. Getting your blood moving helps reduce inflammation and reduces tension in your muscles. The North...



Plentiful Plates, Not Pills

For most people, incorporating a variety of fruits and vegetables into their daily diet will provide an array of important nutrients – no multivitamin required. More than one-third of Americans take multivitamins, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). However, multivitamins do not provide the same health benefits as consuming a variety of fruits and vegetables. Your body may not fully absorb them, and foods contain other nutrients, such as fiber, that you cannot...



Win the Fight Against Weekend Warrior Injuries

If you spend Saturday and Sunday tackling chores or workouts you couldn’t complete during the week, you may put yourself at risk for injury. One of the most effective ways to avoid weekend warrior injuries is to exercise most days of the week and tackle home improvement projects as they arise, instead of trying to cram a week’s worth into one or two days. This quick guide can help you avoid starting the workweek in pain. Ankle sprain – If you like to spend weekends running...



Don't Give Up on Your New Year's Resolutions

It’s that time again when people begin new workout regimens, rid their cabinets of junk food and embark on a frenzy of decluttering. Each new year offers a fresh start that gets us excited about improving our lives, yet approximately 80% of people give up on their New Year’s resolutions by February, according to U.S. News & World Report. As the excitement of the new year wears off, lack of motivation could be the reason, but there are some steps you can take to stay on track. Here...



A Labor of Love

Every day when our teams in Labor and Delivery and Mother/Baby at Archbold come to work, they have one goal: Create an environment where families feel safe and excited to welcome a new baby into the world. “We want our patients to go home with confidence that all of their needs have been met,” said Whitney Sampson, RN, nurse manager of mother/baby at Archbold said. “We empower our patients throughout the process, from labor to birth to going home.” All Together Now From the...



Steps to Better Health

Walking may not get the same glory as pumping iron or running a marathon, but it can be one of the easiest forms of exercise to start – and stick with for the long term. If you stay consistent, you can see health improvements from just three to four hours of walking each week. In addition to helping you get in shape, walking: Boosts bone health. Weight-bearing exercises, such as walking, can increase your bone density, which may lower your risk of developing fractures or...



Screening Seniors Shouldn't Skip

Screenings can help detect conditions early, when they’re easier to treat. Here’s why it’s important for seniors to stay on track. As you age, the risk for chronic disease increases. The National Institutes of Health recommends the following screenings for adults age 65 and older: Blood pressure – Having your blood pressure checked at least once every year and keeping it under control can prevent heart disease. Breast cancer – Women ages 65 and older account for almost...