Crissy Williams

“There were a multitude of factors that led me to a decision to try bariatric surgery,” said Crissy Williams. “I no longer felt healthy, and I was uncomfortable sitting in chairs, lying down, getting up and my joints were tired of me. I felt horrible about myself, and my daughter was watching. I knew I needed an intervention.”

Williams struggled for 13 years to lose weight. She tried Omninitrition, which is an HCG diet, and a no-carb diet. She would lose the weight, but the loss never lasted.

“I felt like a failure,” said Williams. “I had low self-esteem because I would put the weight back on.”

Williams had a gastric sleeve procedure at Archbold Memorial Hospital on July 12, 2018. Board-certified bariatric surgeon Katie Hanisee, MD, performed her surgery.

“I weighed 303 pounds when I started the my bariatric journey, but I’ve now lost 101 pounds and am closer to my goal weight of 180 pounds,” said Williams.

Since the surgery, Williams has seen a multitude of changes in her life.

A new way of life

“The surgery has made such an impact on my lifestyle,” said Williams. “I’m now able to play laser tag with my children for the first time and ride rollercoasters. I can lean over and pick things up off the floor. I can cross my legs, tie my shoes and wear clothing that’s not out of a plus-size store.”

The key to successful bariatric surgery is reteaching your body how to eat.

“The surgery has changed my way of thinking when it comes to meals,” said Williams. “I’m no longer living to eat, but eating to live. I’m more aware of what I put into by body.”

Williams’s newfound favorite food is riced cauliflower, since it can be used in many different ways. Salsa with cheese chips have also become her go-to snack.

“My advice to people considering the weight loss surgery is ‘Don’t wait, just do it,’” said Williams. “It’s worth the money and it’s worth your life.”

“I feel healthier,” she said. “I can move without getting short of breath; I sleep better and have more energy. And my two children are happier because I can do more things with them.”

For more information on Archbold’s Bariatric Weight Management program, www.archbold.org/bariatric-surgery.

Tammy Little

“My deciding factor was when I was told by my orthopedist that I was too young to have a knee replacement,” said Little. “I’ve had five previous knee surgeries, and he suggested that I might benefit by seeing a bariatric physician.”

Little has struggled with her weight since middle school, and she tried following Weight Watchers for a while.

According to Little, what made the Archbold Bariatric and Weight Management Program different than any other program was the help she received.

“I have support with this program, which is vital to my success,” said Little. “Dr. Katie Hanisee has this amazing support group, and it makes me feel like I have my own personal cheerleading team. If I have a question, no matter how small or silly I think it is, they always answer it in a serious manner.”

Little had gastric sleeve surgery on September 20, 2018. She has lost 92 pounds from her highest weight, and she plans to lose a total of 114 pounds. This will put her at a normal body mass index.

“This journey has really changed my life in several ways,” said Little. “I’m able to climb steps without feeling as though I need to sit down, and I’m able to walk and stand up easier.”

Little also had to relearn how to eat and read labels.

“Kudos to those who can read labels, because it is really complicated,” said Little. “I’ve also learned that it’s okay to have a little treat every once in a while. We just have to be mindful of what food and how much of it we are putting into our bodies.”

Ready for adventure

One of Little’s biggest accomplishments since joining the bariatric program was horseback riding with her husband for their 25th wedding anniversary.

“My husband and I have always enjoyed horseback riding in the mountains, but we’ve always had to go to a certain farm that could accommodate larger people,” said Little. “This year, for our anniversary, we were able to go to a different place that didn’t have to accommodate us based on our size.”

When asked if someone should consider the bariatric journey, this is what she had to say:

“I would tell someone considering this journey to do research,” said Little. “Bariatric surgery is a life-changing event, and it is not one to be taken lightly. You have to relearn how to eat and will have frustrations, but the good that comes from the journey outweighs the bad.”

For more information on Archbold’s Bariatric Weight Management program, www.archbold.org/bariatric-surgery.